Housing poverty in Slovakia

Support for Roma families, the unemployed and the poorest communities
  • When the program started: 2004 When the program started: 2004
  • Highlights: Whirlpool corporate team worked on the build in Moldava and Bodvou in 2009 Highlights: Whirlpool corporate team worked on the build in Moldava and Bodvou in 2009
  • Families served: More than 1,000 Families served: More than 1,000

Our work to alleviate housing poverty in Slovakia began in 2004 with providing microfinance loans in partnership with the Environmental Training Project, a non-profit organisation.

This project was specifically for Roma families in the east of Slovakia. As time went on projects grew to benefit further families within this region.Roma families often tend to suffer in poverty within Slovakia. Whilst official figures suggest only 2% of the population comprises Roma families, unofficial figures suggest the actual figures are much higher.

Poor housing conditions

The poorer east of Slovakia, where unemployment is very high, is the area in which Roma families most often live in.  The poverty these families face every day is clear from their homes. They often have no access to sewage systems or clean water and live in terribly cramped conditions.

Read about the Environmental Training Project

Dealing with overcrowdedness

Whole families share single room homes with only one bed between them. Many homes belonging to those with lower incomes are poorly insulated and maintained. With high utility rates and no access to bank loans many families suffer in appalling conditions, unable to change their situations.

How we address housing poverty in Slovakia

The project in Slovakia allows low income families access to loans that enable them to improve their housing and help…

The project in Slovakia allows low income families access to loans that enable them to improve their housing and help them take a step towards ending the poverty cycle they are trapped in. The loans are provided in partnership with a non-profit organisation and are designed to suit the needs of the families without being too great a burden of debt upon them.

These loans may be used for renovations, such as the installation of new doors or windows that will help keep heat in, at once providing greater energy efficiency and reducing the cost of bills. Families are also provided with construction training, bringing them new skills and furthering their ability to help themselves in future.

Financial education is also provided, to increase the families’ knowledge of how to manage their finances and increase their understanding of the implications of taking out a microfinance loan. They are also taught how to gain access to further financial assistance in the future.

renovating homes slovakia